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Max Beach

Cover image: Linespace Article in LA Business Journal

Linespace Makes Mark on LA

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Linespace was featured by LA Business journal for the work we’ve done in the region.
“We are a brand experience company that focuses on core messaging for brands through design solutions including signage,”

https://labusinessjournal.com/news/2019/oct/11/design-studio-linespace-makes-its-mark-la/

“Beautiful Friendship: Linespace has worked with USC for more than a decade, including on the development of signage for USC Village.”

One Paseo Retail

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“From the moment you arrive and easily park your car, you know One Paseo is different. Everything about the place is just … easy. Laid back. User friendly. Family-friendly.”

As the last major development in San Diego’s north county Del Mar area, One Paseo is new but feels as if it has been here a long time. It is a merger of a time when country collided with coastal. The stand-alone retail buildings are human scaled, each with a different interpretation of a modern country mart style. Once Paseo is a place that brings kindred spirits together – refined meets casual, rustic meets modern. Where you can live, work, and relax.

Completed: 2019
Designers: Clint Woesner, Christine Pagliarulo, Joseph Escobar, Gary Gareza
Client: Kilroy Realty
Architect: Ware Malcolm
Fabricator: SignAge

more info…

L.A. to Vegas and Back by Electric Car:

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Originally Published in The New York Times

By Ivan Penn

June 22, 2019

LOS ANGELES — You’ve heard it many times, from automakers, the energy industry and government officials: Electric vehicles are the cars of the future, essential to the fight against climate change.

Yet that grand vision may founder on something most drivers take for granted: the pit stop.

Most electric cars need to be plugged in after they’ve traveled 200 to 250 miles — a much shorter distance than similarly sized gasoline vehicles can run on a full tank — and charging them can take an hour or more.

What’s more, chargers are often missing in the places where people need them — like the parking lots and garages of apartment buildings, where residents have had to go to great lengths to top up their car batteries, even dangling extension cords from their balconies.

Changing consumer habits is difficult in the best of circumstances, but it is much harder when a new technology makes it less convenient to use something as essential as your car…

EVgo, for example, has put many of its chargers in high-traffic locations, especially in Los Angeles and San Francisco. But the company is trying to make sure that people in disadvantaged and rural communities are not left out, said Julie Blunden, an executive vice president.

“We just can’t build fast enough,” Ms. Blunden said. “But there are things to consider. What makes sense? What are the ramifications for urban planning?”

EVgo aims to become profitable by persuading consumers to make public chargers a regular part of their lives. That is partly why the company recently reached a deal to put its chargers at a few Chevron gas stations in California.

Brendan Jones, the chief operating officer of Electrify America, pointed out that the infrastructure for charging was cheaper and easier to build than the large tanks required for gasoline and diesel fuel. His company is trying to make them ubiquitous, believing that the demand will increase to justify the investment.

“I’ve put them everywhere,” Mr. Jones said. “I’ve put them at malls. I’ve put them at Walmarts.”

For their part, property owners say having chargers can help attract customers for other businesses. Macerich, a real estate investment firm that owns the Mall of Victor Valley, said it was adding charging stations at 23 shopping centers.

Some elected leaders have endorsed that “build it and they will come” approach, and are even using taxpayer funds to advance it.

read the entire article here

MGA Campus Could Redesign Chatsworth

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Originally published in the San Fernando Valley Business Journal on February 18, 2019.

From a civic center to corporate offices to an upcoming live/work campus in Van Nuys, Linespace has exerted a game-changing impact on Valley architecture.

The Los Angeles design studio, forged by partners Nick Groh, Clint Woesner and Max Beach, is currently working on the new MGA Entertainment headquarters project, which they hope will transform Chatsworth into a high-tech hub.

GMA Chief Executive Isaa Larian has relocated the world’s largest privately-owned tow company from its Van Nuys digs to a new headquarters at an in-progress campus being developed by Jason Larian, the chief executive’s son.

Branded 24, the ambitious project at 20000 Praire St, bound by Winnetka Avenue to the west and Prairie Street to the north and currently in phase two of three of its construction schedule, is keeping Linespace’s core team buy as they create all kinds of elements for the office park, including a 15-foot-high, aluminum-forged contemporary sculpture which, depending on which angle it is viewed, either resembles the number “24” or abstract art.  They are also conceiving the site wayfinding totems, a combination of metal and acrylic… read more.

A sneak peak at Kilroy’s One Paseo Project…

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A sneak peak at what’s taking shape at Kilroy’s One Paseo project. In a day and age when digital technology allows us to easily print photographs the size of buildings there is something to be said about the authenticity in doing things the “old school” way. Our graphic enhancements for the parking structure at One Paseo are being applied with a steady hand. (installed by Sign Age)

A presentation with USC University Architect about Campus Wayfinding & Placemaking

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Linespace Partner, Clint Woesner, gives a joint presentation with USC University Architect, Jon Soffa, about Campus Wayfinding & Placemaking to Capital Construction and Development staff. The discussion focuses on the visitor journey and brand experience within the physical campus. Linespace has worked with Jon to develop standards for identity and wayfinding at USC

RAVE Wows with New Screens and Cloud Storage Upgrade

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Originally published on runwaygirlnetwork.com on July 23, 2018.

As Zodiac Inflight Innovations’ RAVE on-demand inflight entertainment system has made its way on board with smaller operators and renovated subfleets of larger carriers, the system has largely performed well, with positive reviews from airlines and passengers alike.

Yet the next generation of the product — both in hardware and software — seem set to be a step change in how the IFE looks, feels and is delivered. A new generation of thin, elegant screens named RAVE Ultra features a modern design with solid-state drives, and Bluetooth audio, while a backwards-compatible upgrade will create RAVE cloud, opening up terabytes of storage for thousands of hours of content.

Zii demonstrated its new system to Runway Girl Network earlier in the year at the Aircraft Interiors Expo, where the design factor of the RAVE Ultra hardware was matched only by the promise of the cloud software. The new screens’ futuristic design and clean profile are markedly beyond the industrial design with which passengers are presently familiar.

RAVE Ultra, explains Zodiac Inflight Innovations EVP and Chief Commercial Officer Larry Girard, “will utilise a capacitive in-cell touchscreen capable of supporting multi-touch gestures, providing a comparable experience to the passengers’ own mobile phones, with a display that delivers brilliant 4K resolution. Through the use of optical bonding in the production process, all of this will come in a package that is about 0.3″ thick and a third of the weight and power of current generation displays.”

Zii is planning four sizes for RAVE Ultra: 27”, 17.3”, 15.6”, and 13.3”. Each supports variable bit rate playback of modern compression standards, including H.265 HEVC [High Efficiency Video Coding], which the company suggests more than halves the size of files required for high-definition video, including “ultra-HD” 4K.

Read the full article here.

Andrea Lee joins the Linespace team as Sr. Designer

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Andrea joins Linespace as a seasoned environmental graphic designer with over seven years of experience working on various exterior wayfinding and interior signage programs. She has designed brand identities, print materials, websites and mobile applications in addition to her experience with wayfinding and environmental graphic design. Complementing her creative problem solving she has extensive knowledge regarding industry standard practices, local, state, and federal code requirements, and fabrication techniques. Her experience in project management provides a great deal of support in the design and implementation process.

Background 
Prior to joining Linespace, Andrea worked as a Designer and Project Manager with Egg Office. She has worked on many signage and master planning projects with high profile clients. Andrea gained her first experience and love for wayfinding and environmental graphic design at PH.D, a boutique design studio in Santa Monica. There she had an opportunity to work with clients such as USC School of Architecture, City of Newport Beach, and Camino Nuevo Academy of Schools.

Transforming a Race Series from Chump to Champ

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Mike Chisek sits down with Max Beach at Sonoma Raceway and discusses the ChampCar name and the services that Linespace offers.

“Right from the first presentation you made, I was impressed that this isn’t off the cuff… you were drilling down based on our market and what we were looking for… I was very impressed with the method you guys used.”
– Mike Chisek, CEO, ChampCar

ChampCar was founded in 2009 with an inaugural race in Portland, OR. Since that time, ChampCar has sanctioned over 200 endurance events across the country and hosted more than 10,000 different drivers throughout their history, many of them first-time participants in motorsports!

Originally named ChumpCar the non-profit organization was created to give average people the opportunity to race wheel-to-wheel on a budget. “Chump” was a way for the brand to explain that it is a fun experience for the amateur racer. Over time the series has grown nationally and become quite competitive without losing the low cost operation for it’s race teams. With this came the desire to communicate that however fun and accessible the race series is, it is also professional and well organized.

Our challenge was to transform “Chump” into “Champ” through a complete rebranding along with the name change. The new brand conveys professionalism, speed, competitiveness, and fun. Like so many events and organizations the participant experience is what drives success or failure. A seamless event boosts ongoing participation and leads to brand advocacy through word of mouth. This is the most powerful promotional tool for any organization.

What will your future look like?

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How are your customers going to experience your brand in the next decade? These are the questions we are helping our clients answer as we provide design and visualization for the next stage of their brand experiences. Looking at industry trends, target market desires, and the advancement of technology our team produces a look at the next generation in meaningful brand experiences, giving our clients a target for the evolution of their products and services.

Zodiac First Class Pod: Working with Zii to envision the future of inflight entertainment through a first class seating experience.

EVgo Charge Station: Helping EVgo showcase the next generation of electric vehicle charging stations with an installation between Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

Lexus VR Experience: Bringing the Lexus track experience to visitors through a 360* VR simulator developed and brought to life by SCPS Unlimited.

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